Old Bus Photos

London Transport – AEC Regent Bluebird ST – APC 168 – ST1037

APC 168

Photo: Copyright unknown

LGOC/LGCS/LCBS
1932
AEC Regent
LGOC H26/22R

The Bluebird six-wheel LT was an impressive and attractive variant of the LT class, but the Bluebird ST was rare. ST1037 was one of the first 8 of a total of just 23 Bluebird STs which London General built for their expanding green Country Services. Initially allocated to Windsor Garage by LGOC, under London Transport, it quickly moved to North London , serving at Tring until mid 1948, when it was transferred to Reigate for storage, then quickly re-allocated to Watford High Street Garage as a trainer.
Never having had an overhaul, looking very careworn, with deformed lower panels and body sag extending from bottom to the underside of upstairs windows, she is shown at Epsom Downs on route 406F on the shuttle service from Epsom Station to Epsom Downs during one of the Epsom Racecourse events, most likely around Derby Day, when any bus capable of moving was dragged out of dusty corners over to Morden and other places to operate shuttle services., Post-war, this attraction was often the death knell for some of these loyal, decrepit, worn-out servants, the stigma of imminent doom appearing as a crudely-chalked cross on the nearside wing! In December 1949, the axe fell and she was sold to Daniels of Rainham for scrapping and an undeserved end after over 17 neglected years of service. Not bad for a vehicle with a design life of about 10 years!

A couple of asides:
Note the Morris 8 maintenance van on the right 
Route 406F used the highest suffix letter ever by London Transport.
Some history of this vehicle taken from the excellent Ian’s Bus Stop website.

Photograph and Copy contributed by Chris Hebbron


 

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L. P. T. B. – AEC Regent – DLU 92 – STL 2093

DLU 92

London Passenger Transport Board
1937
AEC Regent O661
London Transport Chiswick H30/26

The STL – the letters stand, rather confusingly, for ‘Short T Long’ – was introduced into London area service firstly by Thomas Tilling in October 1932 and then by the London General Omnibus Company in January 1933. The STL Regent then became the standard double decker for the new London Passenger Transport Board which came into being on 1 July 1933. The chassis was the latest version of the AEC Regent which took advantage of new regulations that allowed for the extension of the overall length from 25ft to 26ft on a wheelbase of 16ft 3ins, and an increase in the rear axle loading from 9½ to 10 tons. The LPTB STL class then reached a total of 2647 by the commencement of war in 1939, and a further 34 unfrozen chassis were added from the end of 1941. Twenty more buses complemented the STL class in 1946, but these were very different beasts from the LPTB specification, being standard post war AEC Regent II machines with provincial style Weymann bodywork. An example of which can be seen here
The STL class underwent several specification changes over its production run and subsequently in service – engine changes (petrol/indirect injection diesel/direct injection diesel) and many bodywork swaps, some arising from the attrition of wartime. STL 2093, DLU 92, seen above during the HCVC Brighton rally of May 1971, was a 1937 chassis powered by the AEC A171 indirect injection 7.58 litre diesel driving through the AEC D132 four speed spring operated preselector gearbox. It was initially bodied by Park Royal, but, being damaged in an air raid, it was sent to Birmingham City Transport for repair in 1944. By 1949 the body was deemed past further use and it was scrapped in February of that year. STL 2093 then received the Chiswick built body from 1939 vintage STL 2570, the chassis of which was then selected to join the expensive and ultimately fruitless SRT conversion programme, under which newer STL chassis were ‘upgraded’ to carry the heavier RT bodywork. Sadly, not only were the SRTs under powered but, more seriously, they couldn’t stop, and the whole wasteful exercise was abandoned ignominiously. This OBP entry contains comments on the SRT debacle. www.old-bus-photos.co.uk/
Meanwhile, now carrying its Chiswick body, STL 2093 soldiered on, even seeing a short spell during 1949 as a Green Line coach on route 703 at Swanley, until its withdrawal from passenger service in 1954 along with the rest of the pre-war/wartime STL class. It was then sold in 1955 to Reliance Services of Newbury who in turn passed it on to a private owner for preservation in May 1958. This was Dennis John Cowing, a chemistry master (and transport enthusiast) at Selhurst Grammar School in Croydon, a master contemporary with my own attendance in a less elevated capacity at that establishment. Mr Cowing rallied the bus for many years and he is driving it in the 1971 picture, but, by 1976, the structure of the vehicle had degenerated alarmingly and it passed into the ownership of Prince Marshall for full restoration. That has since proved to be a mammoth undertaking, currently in the hands of the former Cobham, now Brooklands Museum, where it has more recently been displayed as a bus victim of the blitz.
www.londonbusmuseum.com/

I have gleaned information from various sources for this note, but, as ever, Ian’s Bus Stop has been invaluable.

Photograph and Copy contributed by Roger Cox


26/03/20 – 06:43

One of my favourite buses, in roof-box form, along with the Bluebird LT’s. A shot which brings out the best of its design and in a condition which suggests it’s only been on the road for a few weeks after delivery to LT. Only the parked Ford 105E gives the game away! Yours, Roger? My last glimpse of a working STL was in June 1955. When waiting at traffic lights, one passed across me. It must have been a garage hack on one of its last journeys.

Chris Hebbron


 

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Montagu Motor Museum – Maxwell 25 cwt – CJ 5052

Montagu Motor Museum - Maxwell 25 cwt - CJ 5052

Montagu Motor Museum
1922
Maxwell 25 cwt
14 seat charabanc body.

Something a little different here. CJ 5052 is a Maxwell 25 cwt chassis of the USA powered by a four cylinder 3.09 litre side valve engine and fitted with a 14 seat charabanc body of unknown make. The Maxwell business began in 1904 as the Maxwell – Briscoe Company, a car manufacturer which, by 1909, was the third  largest after Ford and General Motors. The Maxwell company began taking over other pioneer manufacturers, including the Columbia Motor Car which held the Selden patent. This patent remarkably declared that the petrol powered four wheeled automobile had been invented by George B Selden of Rochester, New York in 1878, eight years before Benz in Germany, and in 1895 the patent was granted entitling Selden to a royalty payment on all cars built in the United States. Unsurprisingly, this did not suit Henry Ford who legally contested the patent, finally winning his case in 1911, when the lucrative Selden income to the Maxwell Company came to an end. In 1913 the firm was reorganised as the Maxwell Motor Company Inc. and added light commercial vehicles to its car ranges from 1917. During the post WW1 slump in sales – a similar situation occurred in Britain as surplus military vehicles flooded the markets – Maxwell ran into financial difficulties and sold out to Walter Chrysler in 1921. Four years later, having made further company acquisitions, Chrysler founded his own Chrysler Corporation into which the Maxwell business was absorbed. This charabanc dates from 1922 when it was bought new (the chassis price was £280) by Victory Garage, Hereford, who ceased using it in 1929. The subsequent history is uncertain until Lord Montagu bought it in 1957 for complete restoration, and from 1962 it appeared on many HCVC Brighton runs. It is seen here on the A23 Crawley By Pass during the May 1970 event.

Photograph and Copy contributed by Roger Cox


25/02/20 – 09:59

On SORN at the moment. Does anyone know where and what is its current state?

David C


26/02/20 – 17:28

CJ 5052_2

I took this photo at Beaulieu in May 2018.

John Lomas


27/02/20 – 06:12

Still a static exhibit in the museum, this pic taken in Jan 2020 www.flickr.com/photos/preservedtransport/

John Wakefield


 

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Old Bus Photos from Saturday 25th April 2009 to Wednesday 8th April 2020